19 May 2014

Auction is over!

Color me happy!MY THANKS GO out to everyone who talked to me about the paintings. There was a wee bit of last-minute interest, but the auction is now closed. And no bunnies died, David! 

I recognize that original art is a luxury item. For most people these days, “luxuries” extend little further than eating out at a restaurant, or simply paying bills on time. Decades ago, someone told me “Art is priceless. Any specific piece of artwork is worth exactly what someone will pay for it.” I sincerely appreciate these good men who elected to spend some disposable income on my art.

In my own case, paying bills and not having the dogs look woefully at me over their empty dinner bowls makes me much happier. If I still had a cat, I would always be accused of malice should a dinner bowl turn up momentarily empty. Dogs are more understanding but the bleakness of sad puppy-dog eyes can rip out your heart.

In any case, my deep congratulations to the winners! I am always glad to know my work is going to a good home. I know that is certain with these two pieces. Thank you all!

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14 Responses to Auction is over!

  1. I’m happy to hear about the successful conclusion of your auction. Well done.

  2. Ellon says:

    Congrats to the winners. I’m sorry I wasn’t able to participate in this one.

    Yay feeding the pets!

    • Liz Danforth says:

      You have been a generous supporter at other times, Ellon, and I understand very well how fortunes ebb and flow in one’s life. I hope you see brighter days soon!

  3. DavidO says:

    Liz,
    Having recently purchased two pieces of art from you (for a well-regarded, but defunct CCG), I can comment on the buyer’s end, albeit for pieces other than what was auctioned here. For me, the art helps establish a deeper connection with the game or setting. One featured an iconic character central to the narrative arc. It shows him just at the cusp of manhood – still innocent, but knowing dark times are ahead. I also appreciated the authenticity of the southwestern landscape that Liz clearly knows and loves. The other piece was for a spell card that had the game effect of removing a deed or property from the game. Liz’s art really brought the theme and effect to life. Looking at the art reminds me of those times where I used the card to swing/change the game. Whether RPG, CCGs, tabletops, miniatures, the best gaming moments are about creating and sharing memories. Good art helps set the stage for those special game moments. Thanks Liz, for helping create those special memories :D

  4. dylan says:

    Are any of your old pen drawings for sale?In particular the old middle-earth ones

    • Liz Danforth says:

      Lots and lots of them, yes! I should put up an auction of those. I’ve sold quite a few recently, but there are many more. Subscribe to the blog and I’ll let everyone know as soon as I have a reasonable way to present a good selection!

      • Steve Bruns says:

        Y’know, once DT&T hits the streets, it might be a good time to hit some cons (Archon in St. Louis has an “artist’s alley” for selling autographed reprints, posters and such.) Your work seems like it would lend itself to selling hand-colored copies.

        • Liz Danforth says:

          I used to do a lot of cons, and many have artist shows and art alleys alike. I hope I can do some cons after dT&T is off my plate!

  5. stefanorenco says:

    There’s some half-levity-ish, half-serious-ish talk of a T&T COLORING BOOK on the Inner Sanctum. If I can figure out a way to fund it, there’d be a need for lots of simple B&W line art of adventurers and monsters.

    • Liz Danforth says:

      Haa!! I’d love to participate but ALL my available attention is on getting the darn rules out, Stefan. Already-existing work — maybe!? Nothing new until this monster is vanquished.

  6. Charles Evans says:

    Looking at this I wondered for a moment how artists in previous ages could have survived; but of course they had uber-wealthy patrons. Michelangelo and Leonardo had the Medicis; or in a later era, on the musical front, Tchaikovsky had a wealthy widow. In the old days, politicians and the wealthy sponsored living artists; now they fight over the works of dead ones…

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